Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Deployment Guidance

The Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) Deployment Guidance, developed by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), provides FHWA staff and transportation system owners/operators with guidance as they consider V2I technology in support of connected vehicle programs and applications in their state or region. The V2I Deployment Guidance provides information on a comprehensive set of topics that public agencies will be addressing regarding connected vehicles and the implementation of V2I technologies. These developing technologies are part of ongoing efforts to improve safety, mobility and the environment.

The V2I Deployment Guidance will support FHWA staff and transportation system owners/operators as they deploy two-way V2I technology. It offers a summary of eligibility requirements for funding under the Federal-Aid Highway Program, and encouragement to consider public-private partnerships for deployment. The Guidance provides information to facilitate efficient and effective planning, procurement and operations throughout the full lifecycle of a project.

The Guidance will help state and local agencies understand:

  • what a decision to deploy V2I technology could mean to their region
  • how to prepare for an emerging V2I technology
  • how federal-aid funds could be leveraged to deploy V2I technology

It also provides a list of V2I-related topics that Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), Local Public Agencies (LPAs), transit operators, and states should consider in their long-range planning.

The Next Generation of ITS

V2I is the next generation of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), providing access to vehicle-generated traffic data and a means of wirelessly providing information such as advisories from the infrastructure to the vehicle informing the driver of safety, mobility, or environment-related conditions. Agencies are likely to SAFETY MOBILITY ENVIRONMENT Typically, one-way communication involving data sent to or from a vehicle is distinguished by referring to the initiator of the communications first. For example, communication (such as data about speed and direction) sent from a vehicle to the infrastructure’s receiver is called vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication. Communication sent from the infrastructure (such as from a traffic management center) to a vehicle is called infrastructure-tovehicle (I2V) communication. The Guidance, however, defines V2I as the two-way communications between vehicles and infrastructure. This definition acknowledges the direction of recent innovations. Photo Source: FDOT Photo Source: USDOT install V2I infrastructure alongside or integrated with existing ITS equipment. As such, the majority of V2I deployments may qualify for similar federal-aid programs as ITS deployments, if the deploying agency meets certain eligibility requirements.

Deploying agencies may use funds for equipment, installation, preventive maintenance, and operational costs of V2I technologies, provided the equipment and systems are compatible with the basic connected vehicle standards for interoperability and security standards.

V2I Guidance Topics

The deployment of V2I technologies is not mandated and is not coupled with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) advance notice of proposed rulemaking for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications. An NHTSA rulemaking will not require state and local departments of transportation (DOTs) to deploy V2I technology.

It is important for state and local agencies to understand what a decision to deploy V2I technology could mean to their region and how to prepare for the implementation of V2I technology. The V2I Deployment Guidance provides information for state and local agencies on a broad range of topics as they consider V2I technologies.

Topics the Guidance covers include:

  • Connected Vehicle Applications, programs and software
  • Planning for V2I Activities for MPOs, Local Public Agencies, transit operators and states
  • National Environmental Policy Act and National Historic Preservation Act
  • Interoperability among modes of transportation and on a national level
  • Evaluation of effectiveness, benefit/cost and user satisfaction
  • ITS Equipment Capability and Compatibility for V2I integration and overlay
  • Hardware/Software Device Certification
  • Reliability of deployed equipment
  • Use of Right-of-Way following current regulations and funding eligibility
  • Allowance of Private Sector Use to maximize the possibility of private investment for deployment and operations
  • Design Consideration for Facilities to accommodate installation of V2I roadside equipment
  • Use of Existing Structures and Infrastructure as long as its use has a public benefit and does not create potential safety issues
  • Use of Public Sector Fleet to install and use components that enable V2I applications
  • Procurement Process to enable consistent, secure, and interoperable implementations
  • Legacy System and Devices to be retrofitted, replaced or supplemented by V2I applications
  • Communication Technology that is consistent with application interoperability across the nation
  • Dedicated Short Range Communication (DSRC) Service Licensing
  • Data Connection and Latency to ensure reliable data transfers between vehicles and infrastructure at appropriate transfer speeds
  • Connected Vehicle Privacy Principles
  • Connected Vehicle Security
  • Data Access, assigning data ownership or limiting access to data
  • Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices and its application to the design and content of message displayed on a traffic control device or sent to a driver
  • Using Public-Private Partnership (P3s) and other commercial relationships for deployment

V2I Products

The Guidance offers a summary of V2I products that will be available as an essential supplement to the Guidance. These products are separate reference documents.

  • Connected Vehicle V2I Systems Engineering Guidance
  • Incorporating Connected Vehicles into the Transportation Planning Process
  • Desk Reference and Tools for Estimating the Local, Regional and State-Wide Economic Development Benefits of Connected Vehicle to Infrastructure Deployments
  • Guide to Licensing Dedicated Short Range Communication Roadside Units
  • V2I Message Lexicon
  • Near Term (0-5 years) V2I Transition/Phasing Analysis
  • V2I Pre-Deployment Guidance
  • Connected Vehicle Training Resources

Typically, one-way communication involving data sent to or from a vehicle is distinguished by referring to the initiator of the communications first. For example, communication (such as data about speed and direction) sent from a vehicle to the infrastructure’s receiver is called vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication. Communication sent from the infrastructure (such as from a traffic management center) to a vehicle is called infrastructure-tovehicle (I2V) communication.

The Guidance, however, defines V2I as the two-way communications between vehicles and infrastructure. This definition acknowledges the direction of recent innovations.

Learn More

FHWA encourages state and local agencies, MPOs, and others involved in planning, deploying, operating and evaluating V2I systems to download and use the V2I Deployment Guidance. The Guidance can be found at www.its.dot.gov/v2i.

For more information about this initiative, please contact:

Robert Rupert
Technical Programs Coordinator
FHWA Office of Operations
(202) 366-2194
Robert.Rupert@dot.gov

Jonathan B. Walker, P.E.
USDOT
ITS Joint Program Office (JPO)
(202) 366-2100
Jonathan.B.Walker@dot.gov