Research Archive

General Guidance

Title  Abstract How to Use Useful to Date
Develop Alternative Definitions for Corridor and Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Discusses key attributes that were identified for possible inclusion in definitions used for the ICM initiative. It also presents final versions of these definitions, incorporating comments by FHWA and the ICM stakeholders. Transportation professionals in the field involved in some stage of the ICM lifecycle can use this document to help them define their ICM corridor, its boundaries, scope and reach. It offers various stakeholder and historical perspectives of how to define a corridor. Transportation infrastructure managers and operators 4/06
Generic ICM Concept of Operations This is a high-level Concept of Operations (Con Ops) for a "generic" 15 mile-corridor, consisting of freeway, arterial, bus and rail networks, and serving a central business district. The document's primary purpose is to provide an example of an ICM Con Ops that can be used by agency and network owners as the basis for developing their own corridor-specific and real-world Concept of Operations. Transportation professionals in the field seeking to implement ICM can use this document to develop their own concepts of operation for ICM. It can also help transportation professionals at all levels (Federal, State and local) understand all of the elements involved in ICM. It is intended to help practitioners flexibly design their own custom, tailored concept of operations based on their corridor's unique conditions and requirements.
NOTES:
  • All information about the generic corridor herein is purely fictional, fabricated based on the Project Team's collective experience, to provide a basis for describing the ICM operational concepts herein. The CONOPS for a real corridor will have more information.
  • The actual situation for most real-world corridors will undoubtedly be different from this generic corridor in terms of network types and other corridor characteristics, stakeholders, institutional and technical environments and the ICM concept and operational capabilities as discussed herein. Accordingly, users should tailor the information and/or sections within each chapter of this Generic CONOPS to develop their site-specific ICM CONOPS to meet any and all of their unique corridor conditions.
  • The generic corridor and the associated CONOPS does not attempt to be all-inclusive with respect to the types of networks that might be included within a corridor, the ICM stakeholders, and the operational approaches and strategies to be deployed.
Transportation agency and/or network owners

Transportation professionals at all levels (Federal, State and local)
4/06
Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative ICMS Surveillance and Detection Requirements for Arterial and Transit Networks This report documents the Integrated Corridor Management System (ICMS) surveillance and detection requirements for arterial streets and transit networks to support an ICMS design. Data flows, needs, and concepts are provided for readers to learn how to monitor arterial and transit aspects of an ICMS. This document can be used when developing surveillance and detection systems for monitoring arterial roadways and transit agencies when looking to optimize a corridor. This document is useful to transportation practitioners who are developing an ICMS when looking for ways to monitor and control arterial and transit aspects of a corridor. 11/09
Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative: Evaluation of the Pioneer Demonstration and the Real-Time Transit Vehicle Data Demonstration This presentation provides an overview of the evaluation of the pioneer demonstration and the real-time transit vehicle data demonstration. This ICM Initiative evaluation reviews the real-time transit data utility, quality, operational impacts, benefits of costs analysis, policy implications, lessons learned, and quality and system performance. Users can read this presentation to get a status update of the evaluation of the ICM demonstration in San Diego and Dallas Transportation practitioners interested in the status of the USDOT’s ICM Initiative and its activities at the Pioneer Sites. 3/11
Integrated Corridor Management: Implementation Guide and Lessons Learned The purpose of this ICM Implementation Guide is to provide information to ICM “early adopters” on how to plan, develop, deploy, operate, and maintain an ICM system (ICMS). The Guide describes the phases in the ICMS life cycle and the associated deliverables for each phase, focusing on how the ICM Pioneer Sites addressed each phase. The guide also discusses typical issues (lessons learned) that arose during the U.S. DOT’s research initiative. Transportation professionals who will be involved in some stage of the ICM lifecycle can use this document to gain a high-level overview of the process steps needed to develop, implement and operate an ICM system. It can also help transportation professionals at all levels (Federal, State and local) who are generally interested to learn more about what ICM is and how to implement it. Transportation project managers who wish to implement an ICMS in their region 2/15
Relationship Between Corridor Management and Regional Management Compares and contrasts Integrated Corridor Management and Regional Management, identifying the similarities, differences, and relationships between Integrated Corridor Management and Regional Management. Transportation professionals at all levels involved in ICM or regional planning for operations efforts can use this document to help them understand the similarities and distinctions between concepts and terminology of regional management, regional ITS Architectures and ICM as well as how these concepts relate to each other. Transportation professionals at all levels (Federal, State and local) 4/06
Traffic Analysis Toolbox Volume XIII: Integrated Corridor Management Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation Guide The purpose of this document is to help corridor stakeholders implement the ICM AMS methodology successfully and effectively. This guide provides a step-by-step approach to implementation of the ICM AMS methodology, and reflects lessons learned in its application to the three ICM Pioneer Sites and a test corridor. This document can be used to gain a high-level overview of the AMS process. It can also be used as a framework for developing an effective analysis plan to support selection and application of available tools and models specifically conducive to ICM. "Technical and/or program managers in transportation agencies at the State or local level who may oversee implementation of ICM and/or an ICM AMS initiativ" 5/12
USDOT Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative ICMS Surveillance and Detection Needs Analysis for the Arterial Data Gap This report analyzes the need for arterial data within an Integrated Corridor Management System (ICMS), identifies data that is currently available related to arterial systems, and identifies potential sources of additional arterial-related data. Surveillance and detection needs analysis results are discussed, along with current and emerging approaches for collecting data along arterial roadways. Performance measures used in arterial roadway management are also described. This document can be used when developing a list of needs and solutions when designing an ICMS, specifically when looking at how arterial road networks are planned for in an ICMS. This document is useful to transportation practitioners who are developing an ICMS that includes arterial road networks. 11/08
USDOT Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Initiative ICMS Surveillance and Detection Needs Analysis for the Transit Data Gap This report analyzes the need for transit data within an Integrated Corridor Management System (ICMS), identifies data that is currently available related to transit systems, and identifies potential sources of additional transit-related data. Surveillance and detection needs are discussed, as well as current data gathering approaches being used in the field. Performance measures that are specific to transit needs are also discussed. This document can be used when developing a list of needs and solutions when designing an ICMS, specifically when looking at how transit partners play into the needs of the ICMS. This document is useful to transportation practitioners who are developing an ICMS that includes transit partners. 11/08

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